Sex Education in School

Subject: Education
Type: Analytical Essay
Pages: 8
Word count: 2182
Topics: Adolescence, High School, Public Health, Sex Education
Save this page for later by
adding it to your bookmarks
Press Ctrl+D (Windows)
or Cmd+D (Mac OS)
Text
Sources

Goals

The purpose of this training program is to:

  1. Create awareness among students regarding issues such as, pubescence, sexual alignment and sex character.
  2. Help students handle and maintain relationships on a family, romantic and other levels.
  3. Learn skills crucial for decision-making and social interactions.
  4. Promote sexual behavior awareness among students.
  5. Improve students’ sexual health knowledge (STDs and methods of birth control).
  6. Increase students’ awareness of society and culture and how they influence sexual behavior.

The goals stated above are meant to help students when choosing mechanisms and programs that prevent them from sexual risks. The program goals develop a cooperation that assists youths to understand specific health behaviors and acquire knowledge valuable in society.

Need a custom paper ASAP?
We can do it today.
Tailored to your instructions. 0% plagiarism.

Why is sex education important in schools?

Sex education conjures the comfortable moments for an adolescent. Changes to education system require increasing the knowledge and skills required by the youths on the importance of learning about sexuality from an early age.  Sex education is important as it is a procedure of passing information and shaping mentalities and convictions about sex, gender identity, relationships, health, intimacy, human development and society and culture perceptions. Sex education allows students to develop skills that help in decision-making about behavior, which is important for building confidence and competent about choices for the society and for personal values. Sex education program is important and the training purpose is to find out why it should be an exclusive purpose of the education program. In addition, the training program is to create clarity about social psychology and health gains associated with learning about abstinence from sexual activity.

Target population

Sex education is meant for youths because it provides important information that helps the youth enhance quality relationships and develop decision-making skills that are valuable for their lives. Additionally, the target population is the youth because at this stage they experience biological changes of puberty and the principle of health education is important to create a mainstream of understanding about attitude and beliefs of sex. Youths are chosen for this training program because they represent the majority of the population that is affected by sexually transmitted infections. Young people develop sexual desires and this makes them sexually hyperactive at puberty. As a result, the program targets the youths to provide knowledge and skills required as a guide to implementing the values for positive health impacts.

Deadlines from 1 hour
Get A+ help
with any paper

Abstracts

  1. Donovan, P. (1998). School-based sexuality education: The issues and challenges. Journal of perspectives on sexual and reproductive health, 30(4). 188-193. Retrieved from https://www.guttmacher.org/journals/psrh/1998/07/school-based-sexuality-education-issues-and-challenges
  2. Furnham, A., & Tsoi, T. (2012). Personality, gender, and background predictors of partner preferences. North American Journal of Psychology, 14(3), 435-454. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1287407077?accountid=45049
  3. Moe, J. L., Reicherzer, S., & Dupuy, P. J. (2011). Models of sexual and relational orientation: A critical review and synthesis. Journal of Counseling and Development: JCD, 89(2), 227-234. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/858390607?accountid=45049
  4. Vrangalova, Z., & Savin-williams, R. (2011). Adolescent sexuality and positive well-being: A group-norms approach. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 40(8), 931-44. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-011-9629-7
  5. Doty, N. D., Willoughby, B. B., Lindahl, K. M., & Malik, N. M. (2010). Sexuality-related social support among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 39(10), 1134-47. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/746773373?accountid=45049

The abstracts listed are reports conducted on the psychology of human sexuality. The articles have details on the mental perception of sexuality by people and this is relevant to initiate the training program. Psychology understanding of sexuality is important for designing a program that is useful for designing topics about sexuality. The program requires educators to have adequate knowledge of conducting sex education. Abstracts mentioned above helps in understanding boundaries asserted in education and community systems. As a result, the training program utilizes the process mentioned in the articles to help to create a safe physical and emotional environment for everybody. Proposal for this training program is because the research done by the above authors indicate the need to understand the psychology of human sexuality and need for the provision of sex education.

Introduction (The problem)

Sex education is something the society shy away from and there is need to make sex as consent in schools. Sexuality education is not just about biology but a move to create awareness about sexual behavior, contraception, and sexually transmitted diseases (Donovan, 1998). As a result, sex education prepares students from kindergarten through ninth grade on the importance of abstinence, which is a comprehensive health education program. The facts about comprehensive sex education are essential for preparedness on topics related to sex, which explores values and beliefs. In addition, sex education in school setting helps students understand the topic and gain skills required to navigate relationships as well as management of sexual health. Sex education is important to reduce discrimination and improve educational experiences for both boys and girls making the training program important.

Many parents have the reluctance to provide sexual health topics because sexuality is thought to be a taboo in most cultures. Asian American parents do not engage their children in sex education and therefore there is the need for a comprehensive sexual health education (Donovan, 1998). Policies in schools are therefore required in the curricula to enable the community to understand the need for sexual health. The need to influence abstinence as a sexual health advantage is important for people at a young age. The reluctance of parents to teach children about sex influences a direct engagement of the program in schools to unmask health issues associated with sex. The move is to influence sexual development understanding, as a natural part of growing up for children, which is vital for the overall well-being.

A system of sex education works best for children and influences academic evaluations. Students feel segregated because of lacking knowledge and skills about sexuality. The training program recommends that sex education is for addressing social desirability and this leads to an improvement in student’s understanding of life choices on sexuality (Vrangalova and Savin-williams, 2011). A system of education is important should incorporate sex education because parents fail to improve children’s educational experiences about the topic. Sex education tackles child-child abuse, which is relevant to emphasize safe and healthy relationships. Sex education has an impact on student’s academic achievement. Efforts to achieve a good academic achievement start with the inclusion of sex education because it helps students understand gender roles and identity. Mixed gender classes understand and develop sexuality knowledge experience, which is vital and useful for increasing academic achievement.

turnitin
We can write
your paper for you
100% original
24/7 service
50+ subjects

Youth population has high rates of being affected by sexually transmitted infections and higher teen birth rates in the industrialized world. The problem is not because of failing to understand sexual activity consequences but failure to help the youths understand about health and cognitive disadvantages associated with sex (Furnham & Tsoi, 2012). The program is meant to ensure children and youths do not suffer health disadvantages but to be aware of their welfare and a system that helps them knowledge on human reproduction and sexuality. In addition, the training program is to influence youth to acquire age and culturally appropriate sexual health information. The aim is to reduce rates of teen birth rates and improve youth health status (Doty, Willoughby, Lindahl, & Malik, 2010). As a result, the program will help youths have clarity on values about community, individual and families, which is relevant to address psychological risk and protective factors.

Young adults engage in offensive activities that go against community values. According to Vrangalova and Savin-Williams, sex education program is not just to provide knowledge on sexuality but also an understanding about community values. The program offers a range of topics that help students understand about gender roles and a focus on respecting community values as well as responding to community needs (2011). Youths understanding skills in communication, refusal, and negotiation is because of reliance on participatory methods of learning in schools. The program, therefore, implements activities and offer the education designed for students to understand about protective factors and values that are culturally accepted (Moe, Reicherzer, & Dupuy, 2011). Passing values of sexual behavior, contraception and health issues associated with sex is important for the young people to help them in making positive choices.

Literature Briefs

Donovan, P. (1998). School-based sexuality education: The issues and challenges. Journal of perspectives on sexual and reproductive health.30 (4). 188-193. Retrieved from https://www.guttmacher.org/journals/psrh/1998/07/school-based-sexuality-education-issues-and-challenges

Sex education has hearing and review of instructional materials, which helps teachers to give instruction to students about sexual behavior, contraception, AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. A thorough health training program for understudies in Kindergarten through ninth grade is helpful to make an attention on forbearance as methods of avoiding pregnancy and STDs (Donovan, 1998). Sex education’s broader aspect is to open doors for students so they can acquire knowledge on sexual matters, develop skills to handle relationship issues, and avoid activities that cause sexual addiction.

Get your paper done on time by an expert in your field.
plagiarism free

Furnham, A., & Tsoi, T. (2012). Personality, gender, and background predictors of partner preferences. North American Journal of Psychology, 14(3), 435-454. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1287407077?accountid=45049

The article explains self-evaluation about ability, personality, character, physical, resources, and values based on the significance of sexual knowledge. The effects of sex differences and similarity determine values and personality of an individual.  Furnham and Tsoi explain sex-role socialization and individual advancement based on understanding structural differences.

Moe, J. L., Reicherzer, S., & Dupuy, P. J. (2011). Models of sexual and relational orientation: A critical review and synthesis. Journal of Counseling and Development: JCD, 89(2), 227-234. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/858390607?accountid=45049

The article explains and describes the wonder of sexuality as it applies to human advancement. The article has critical overview and combination of models of sexual orientation and relations. Moe, Reicherzer & Dupuy recommends on what is required for counselors and adaptation to a model of presenting sexuality as well as directions on how the research reached to conclusions on conceptual knowledge and practical experiences about sexuality.

Vrangalova, Z., & Savin-williams, R. (2011). Adolescent sexuality and positive well-being: A group-norms approach. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 40(8), 931-44. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-011-9629-7

Mental health and sexual activities in teenagers’ life follow a group-normative pattern. The aspect of sexual experience expectations onset varies in a number of students. Early onset individuals have higher quality of welfare than normative onset individuals

guarantee
Essay writing service:
  • Excellent quality
  • 100% Turnitin-safe
  • Affordable prices

Doty, N. D., Willoughby, B. B., Lindahl, K. M., & Malik, N. M. (2010). Sexuality-related social support among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 39(10), 1134-47. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/746773373?accountid=45049

Sexual identity is important to help young people especially the lesbian, gay and bisexual develop social support and resilience. Youths experience with this kind of sexual identity has difficulty in coping with the stressors. The perceptions of support are important to support several types of problems, for example, emotional pain and cradle against negative impacts of sexuality distress.

Course sessions

The sessions will provide growth and development, sex and sexuality with test activities to kick the lessons off. A sheltered space for everybody is the principal concern took after by passing on total and precise data on conceptive and sexual health subjects.

Session 1: Details of the human body

The exercise will involve teaching and demonstration of the anatomy of human body.

Session 2:  Sexuality

Sexuality teaching will involve the provision of basic information about the content of sexuality.

Session 3: Personal relationships

Exercise will constitute an open dialogue and discussion of the topic by the students.

Session 4: Responsible sexual behavior

Exercise: presenting dos and don’ts about sexual relationship

Session 5: Communication and perception of opposite-sex individuals

Exercise: Assurance of confidentiality and encouraging the young people to accept every individual and avoid judging each other

Session 6: Physical and emotional aspects of relationships

The exercise is to encourage every student to understand what relationships are for and learn decision-making and negotiation skills.

Session 7: Fundamentals of human reproduction

Human reproduction and demonstration of changes associated with it will be the exercise of this topic.

Session 8: Ways of expressing sexuality

The topic exercise will involve teaching the students on gender roles and diversity as well as understanding the consent of expressing different sexuality.

Session 9: Unplanned pregnancy and STIs prevention

Exercise: Teaching drawing the line and respecting the line of sexual activities

Session 10: HIV and safer sex practices

Giving explanations and information about HIV and safer practices will be the exercise as well as building a rapport with the young people to embrace abstinence.

Need a custom paper ASAP?
We can do it today.
Tailored to your instructions. 0% plagiarism.

Results

The results are meant to achieve the set goals of the program and its expected that the sessions will be helpful. The expectations are to help students understand what it is all about sex education. At the end of the program, the expected results are a reduction of a number of planned teenage pregnancies, decrease in frequency of sexually transmitted diseases and infections and improvement of youth’s communication between their peers and their parents. The program additionally expects to enable youths staying healthy by making positive life choices as well engaging in safe sexual practices or opting for abstinence. In addition, in my own experience, the program hopes for the provision of assistance to youths about society and culture, which involve gender roles, diversity and sexuality in media.

Did you like this sample?
  1. Donovan, P. (1998). School-Based Sexuality Education: The Issues and Challenges. Journal of perspectives on sexual and reproductive health.30 (4). 188-193. Retrieved from https://www.guttmacher.org/journals/psrh/1998/07/school-based-sexuality-education-issues-and-challenges
  2. Doty, N. D., Willoughby, B. B., Lindahl, K. M., & Malik, N. M. (2010). Sexuality-related social support among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 39(10), 1134-47. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/746773373?accountid=45049
  3. Furnham, A., & Tsoi, T. (2012). Personality, gender, and background predictors of partner preferences. North American Journal of Psychology, 14(3), 435-454. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1287407077?accountid=45049
  4. Moe, J. L., Reicherzer, S., & Dupuy, P. J. (2011). Models of sexual and relational orientation: A critical review and synthesis. Journal of Counseling and Development: JCD, 89(2), 227-234. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/858390607?accountid=45049
  5. Vrangalova, Z., & Savin-williams, R. (2011). Adolescent sexuality and positive well-being: A group-norms approach. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 40(8), 931-44. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-011-9629-7
  6. Kaushik, N., Garg, R., & Saxena, P. (2012). Factor influencing choice of single-sex education and coeducational classes among students. Globsyn Management Journal, 6(1), 41-48. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1491113329?accountid=45049
  7. Lee, C., Tran, D. Y., Thoi, D., Chang, M., Wu, L., & Trieu, S. L. (2013). Sex education among Asian American college females: Who is teaching them and what is being taught. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 15(2), 350-356. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10903-012-9668-5
  8. Sandfort, T. G. M., PhD., Bos, H. M. W., PhD., Collier, K. L., M.P.H., & Metselaar, M., M.A. (2010). School environment and the mental health of sexual minority youths: A study among Dutch young adolescents. American Journal of Public Health, 100(9), 1696-700. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/747120208?accountid=45049
  9. Sturova, M. P. (2001). The system of education and youth crime. Russian Social Science Review, 42(5), 36-49. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/236541027?accountid=45049
  10. Susan, M., Blake, R. L., Lehman, T., Goodenow, C., & al, e. (2001). Preventing sexual risk behaviors among gay, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents: The benefits of gay-sensitive HIV instruction in schools. American Journal of Public Health, 91(6), 940-6. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/215107550?accountid=45049
Find more samples:
Related topics
More samples
Related Essays